In July 2009, May Sheqem proudly graduated with an MBA after 3 years of hard work
studying. May, who is currently a Business Manager at Nasser Bin Nawaf & Partners
Holdings in Qatar, is just one of a growing number of alumni pursuing higher education
online. Now hooked on online learning, May has taken on the challenge of yet another
postgraduate degree with the University of Liverpool and is currently undertaking the online
LLM in International Business Law.

We asked May to tell us about her expectations, the benefits of online learning, day-to-day experiences, and the support she received.

May, congratulations on your MBA! It’s great to hear that you’ve decided to continue to further your education with another online programme. Tell us how you’re finding your LLM programme so far.

Quite simply, the University of Liverpool offers a great LLM programme. It is demanding, challenging and full of content. As you know I’m already a graduate with the University of Liverpool, and I was really satisfied with my MBA studies, so I knew what to expect when choosing to follow another online programme with the University.

What about the support you received from your family and employer?

My family were initially not that enthusiastic for me to embark on undertaking a postgraduate degree online! They were worried that it wouldn’t be with a reputable university.

But the fact that I chose an accredited programme with a reputable school makes all the difference as I didn’t have to worry that the quality of the programme would be compromised because it’s delivered online. But since my MBA and now with my LLM my family have been incredibly supportive.

My employer is also very supportive of my studies. Since completing my MBA in 2009 I was handed new responsibilities in my job. And since starting my current Law programme I have been working on more legal issues at work. I’m already bringing my studies into my day-to-day activities.

What do you think are the main advantages of online learning?

A big advantage is its flexibility of time. It becomes easier to juggle your daily tasks as an executive, a wife, a mother and a student when the programme is this flexible in terms of time. The forum is open 24/7 and you have deadlines to abide by every week, but at the same time are free to work whenever you want, and however you want, as long as you stick to your deadlines.

Another great advantage of online learning is when I study topics in my classes and then come across them the next day at work. The international mix in the classrooms is also very enriching, academically and culturally. You really learn so much from your fellow students, the countries they come from, their habits and cultures.

Tell us about the biggest challenge you experienced?

Well with the flexibility of the programme also comes the challenge of time management. Between my house, my daughter (and her requirements of homework, activities, and quality time) and my work – it’s a tough job! But with proper time management, studying online is definitely manageable.

You mentioned earlier about the international mix of people you met in your virtual classroom. Can you tell us a bit more about that?

There is such a diverse mixture of students in the classroom as people come from all over the globe. This diversity brings a unique colour to the classroom that a normal class might not have. I study with all sorts of professionals with quite different backgrounds. I really treasure this diversity – the fresh perspectives my peers offer from different angles. This is what makes you shift the span of your observation and move away from traditional lines of thinking. It’s quite refreshing really!

In a nutshell, what has happened in your life since taking on your online studies with the University of Liverpool?

I moved to Qatar with my husband at a time when Law was very conventionally practiced. Not only was I a woman in a man’s world, I was also not allowed to practice law being an expat. Since taking on my MBA and successfully completing it, I was assigned two new jobs at my company, and now with the LLM programme, I am getting assigned more and more legal issues every day. All of this came from both programmes with the University of Liverpool. I’m very excited to finish my LLM degree and discover the opportunities that await me.

18th Jan, 2011

Video Presentation

The University of Liverpool, in partnership with Laureate Online Education, B.V. has announced the launch of its new Doctor of Education – Higher Education (EdD). The programme, which has a first intake date of 21 April 2011, will offer professional educators, administrators and academics the opportunity to earn their advanced degree from one of the leading institutions of higher education in the UK.

The programme is offered through the University of Liverpool’s Centre for Lifelong Learning. The Centre is widely recognised for delivering high-quality educational development qualifications to both University of Liverpool staff and the staff of international partner universities. The online format allows students to interact with other professionals worldwide, facilitating an international classroom setting for networking and exchange of ideas.

“We are very proud to be able to draw upon the Centre for Lifelong Learning’s excellence in Educational Development, combined with the leadership expertise of the University’s Management School, to offer one of the first Doctor of Education programmes available 100% online,” said Professor Sir Howard Newby, Vice Chancellor of the University of Liverpool. “Our EdD programme adopts an innovative, integrated approach to learning – positioning graduates as globally-minded educators specialising in Higher Education and leadership thinking within international environments.”

The online EdD will be of particular appeal to individuals seeking to operate at the highest levels of practice in higher education and educational leadership and management. The programme will also appeal to academics who wish to delve beyond the classroom and into the discipline of teaching and leadership at the university level.

Designed to fit in with an individual’s personal time commitments, the University of Liverpool’s online degree programmes enable flexible study periods and encourage students to put the benefit of their education into action in their respective fields. Small classes and a balance of independent study and group projects encourage high levels of interaction with instructors and fellow students worldwide.

The University of Liverpool is a global leader in higher education. Through partnership with Laureate Online Education, B.V., the University of Liverpool became one of the first UK institutions to offer online Masters degrees, catering to the educational needs of working professionals around the world. Today its online Masters and Doctoral programmes, which include Management, Law, Information Technology, Psychology, Health and Education, have more than 3,000 graduates from 175 countries.

About the University of Liverpool
As a member of the Russell Group of leading research universities—the ‘Ivy League’ of UK higher education—the University of Liverpool is at the forefront of academic provision. Founded in 1881 and awarded the Royal Charter in 1903, the University of Liverpool currently offers degree programmes online in Management (specialist programmes include HR, Marketing, International Management and Project Management), Law, Information Technology, Psychology, Health and Education. In 2007, the European Foundation for Management Development (EFMD) awarded accreditation for teChnology-Enhanced Learning (CEL Accreditation) to the University of Liverpool’s online MBA programme delivered in partnership with Laureate Online Education. The University of Liverpool is associated with nine Nobel Laureates and has an annual turnover of £364 million, which includes £97 million in research income.

For more information on our available online programmes, visit http://uol.ohecampus.com/index.php?mod=dcp&act=navigationindex&navigationid=3806&Ref=wwwpr1xxxx

21st Oct, 2010

Industry Interview

Sean Cunningham, Head of the New Scotland Yard Hostage and Crisis Negotiation Unit, United Kingdom.

Can you tell us how you came to be involved with the University of Liverpool and the School of Psychology?

Sean: I actually studied a Masters in Critical and Major Incident Psychology with the University of Liverpool.

But from a professional perspective, the University of Liverpool’s programmes have won me over on a couple of grounds: one, the School of Psychology is linked to the Centre for Critical and Major Incident Psychology (CAMI), which underpins everything that this online degree is all about; the second thing is the quality of the School’s Faculty; and lastly, within the academic world, the University is a member of the Russell Group, which is one of the top 20 universities in the UK. So in terms of academic excellence, you know you’re getting the best.

Since graduating, I’m still involved in various projects with the School’s professors, and have had huge involvement in helping to facilitate immersive exercises – tactical games – for different groups and agencies, as well as for theUniversity.

From a continuous professional development perspective to support your Unit’s skills, why would an online programme be more appropriate than a campus-based programme?

Sean: I think there’s an economic imperative here where “time is money” for everybody, particularly in the modern age. Therefore any time that’s saved

It also means you can work at your own speed. I think people tend to forget that even in a class of 20, there are 20 different speeds running in that class and some people will assimilate knowledge very quickly, others will want a chance to cogitate and think about. And for some of us, the penny doesn't always drop the first time.

As you know, this programme uses real-life scenarios, case studies and the involvement of industry experts to bring the programme to life. How important is it to have relevant, up-to-date, real-life examples to enhance the student experience?

Sean: I think it’s vitally important. I think there’s also another thing that the online world provides which the campus world doesn’t, which is a phrase that’s used in law enforcement – “the loneliness of command”. I believe it’s also used in the military. This means that when you’re in charge, or when you have to make a decision, it’s YOU that has to make that decision.

I actually think the online programme brings that into sharper focus than it does in a classroom environment where there are people in the class who can sit back and enjoy the ride. In an online environment – you’re there – the immersion is involuntary. As soon as you take part in one of the online exercises – the videos, the questions, the tactical games – you’re the one who’s answering them. You’re not part of team, it’s you.

Tell us a bit more about the tactical games, how do they work in the programme?

Sean: Tactical games are completely real scenarios. The problems that are posed, the difficulties that are put up, are things that almost every law enforcement officer will have come across

With the online immersive tactical scenarios, students will be able to give their full concentration, suspend any disbelief that people often cite as the reason for not getting involved in exercises, and go with the flow.

The tactical games, I believe, are currently the best way of immersing someone into a situation and allowing them to feel the pressure of command, and feel the pressure of making decisions or giving advice in a safe environment.

As well as the tactical games, the programme allows students to evaluate and critically reflect on their classroom contributions. How important is this in real-life scenarios?

Sean: You know in real-life there is no chance to practice – you only get the accountability from a debrief, and possibly a trial or an inquest depending on how your situation develops. But there needs to be more of this kind of work. People need to be put into these sorts of situations more often so they know how to react, what their coping mechanisms are, and the position that gives them the best opportunity to make the best decisions for the outcome of the case that they’re dealing with.

Judging by the programme’s first intake, there’s a real mixture of students in the class. Why do you think this programme appeals to so many different professions?

Sean: Obviously this programme is particularly appealing to law enforcement officers. But I actually think law enforcement is just one slice of the “security industry pie”, as this programme reaches a far wider audience. There are cultural mores, habits, and traditions that have to be taken into account but effectively people’s behavior is governed by the rules of psychology. And that’s why this course really will underpin everything that law enforcement professionals think about.

Like all programmes, students will need to bring their own experiences to the table, and put them in and let everybody share from them and then they’ll all learn so much better.

And of course the programme is highly international. Why do you think it’s so important to understand how to work with a diverse group of international professionals?

Sean: We’re a global village whereby everybody works or needs to work with a shared base of understanding. That’s what this programme does, it presents the world – through Laureate – with this opportunity to get a shared understanding of forensic psychology, all of the principles of investigation, and particularly the principles of decision making.

We used to think “we will be working together in the future”, and not we are working together!

From your experience, can you tell us how your Masters programme has helped you?

Sean: How has an MSc helped me? I would say it has helped me to win arguments; sometime before I’ve even opened my mouth! And I’ll tell you why. People give you opportunities because of it. As soon as they know that you have this qualification, all of a sudden doors open for you, and people want to hear what you’ve got to say, and actually value what you’ve got more; because you have the credible badge so to speak.

What I’ve found with psychology, the Critical and Major Incident module in my MSc programme, is that it’s actually crossed over every discipline I work in. Knowing it as I know now, I act as an advisor to many different people within law enforcement but also within government, and it’s just proved so beneficial.

Which professions do you think would benefit from this programme?

Sean: Well within the police, I’d struggle to find an area that wouldn’t benefit from it. The things that come to mind for me are obviously the operational arena in just dealing with a standard investigation, or even a non-standard investigation.

Also in public order terms, in planning for a pre-planned public order event, say a large scale demonstration. Or even – as often happens these days – spontaneous gatherings of people that haven’t been notified to the police. All of that can be trialled within the tactical decision game. All of your decision making can be looked at in this respect.

But then behind the scenes: the planners, the people doing research and development on policing, but also the policy makers – this programme could be really beneficial for them. And further afield – people dealing with crisis and risk management in the public sector; local authorities; councils; town halls.

Finally upon graduating, what impact do you think this online programme will have on an individual’s career?

Sean: It will make you much more evidence based, much stronger in your argument and debate, much more committed to take certain lines of inquiry on an investigation that before you might have just considered very high risk; whereas now you’ll actually see the benefit of it. You’ll be able to argue, and stand your corner where people quiz you and challenge you on decisions that you’ve made. And you’ll be able to explain why you’ve made them in a clear, rational and evidenced way. It opens doors that – and I can say this from experience – that weren’t open before. It acts as a hook, and if you were looking to leave law enforcement for example, or enter a different sector, it would be a real hook for employers looking to have someone with a qualification in this field.

Has Sean’s interview made an impression on you? Click here to read more about the MSc in Forensic Psychology and Criminal Investigation.

MSc in Clinical Research Administration Webinar from Laureateonline on Vimeo.

Learn more about University of Liverpool’s Online Master’s in Public Health and Master’s in Clinical Research Administration.

• The University of Liverpool’s online Master’s in Public Health and 
MSc in Clinical Research Administration programme.
• The prestige and recognition of the University of Liverpool 
• The benefits of studying online 
• The global value and application of the MPH and CRA programmes

For more information click here

A week in the life of an online Masters student from Laureateonline on Vimeo.

Experience the weekly routine of one of our online Masters students in this webinar from our archive.

To request more information click here

Centre for Student Success Webinar from Laureateonline on Vimeo.

The Centre for Student Success offers all students a wide variety of skills modules (academic and technical) and support services that can enhance and develop your academic and study skills to help you succeed in your postgraduate programme.

To request more information click here

15th Sep, 2010

Graduation – July 2010

University of Liverpool Graduation July 2010 from Laureateonline on Vimeo.

University of Liverpool Online students share their experiences of studying online on their Graduation Day.

Request more information now click here

Vertical Study Focus on the Oil & Gas Industry from Laureateonline on Vimeo.

Robert Snell, Managing Partner – Energy and Process Industries Practice at The Quaker Group who specialise in strategy, organisation and operations in the petroleum industry vertical, and Dr. Iain Reid, Director of Studies for MSc in Operations & Supply Chain Management discuss:

  • Career opportunities in the Oil & Gas Industry
  • The Oil & Gas programme specialisation
  • The programme structure and application process
  • The global value of a University of Liverpool online Masters Degree
  • The International diversity of our student profiles

To request more information click here

Jeetendra Lulla (MSc IT) and Hussam Salem Abou-Loghod
(MBA), two recent University of Liverpool graduates tell
us about their expectations, the benefits of online learning,
day-to-day experiences, the support they received and their
plans for the future.
Jeetendra Lulla is an IT consultant from Dubai and a regular
business traveller throughout the Middle East region. He
recently graduated with a Master of Science in Information
Technology.
“After a lot of hard work, this is a great achievement for
me. It’s very highly valued to have a Masters degree in my
industry.”
Jeetendra gave us a brief insight into the day-to-day life
of studying online – “I would be interacting with fellow classmates
from all over the world and you could expect people
responding any time of day. I would log on to the classroom
roughly 4 times a week and the other 2 days I would study by
myself. So on average it would work out at around 2 hours
a day. The interaction in the classrooms themselves was very
exciting – and the opinions, experiences and challenges faced
by different people in different places are varied and quite
unique. This makes you take on a more universal approach
in your thinking.”
Looking forward, Jeetendra told us that achieving his
Masters “has really given me the opportunity to pursue more
academic courses, perhaps another Masters or even the DBA.
Having my MSc in IT gives me a more competitive edge in my
future career.”
Hussam Salem Abou-Loghod is another recent graduate,
having successfully achieved his MBA. Hussam is from
Pakistan and works as CFO for a listed company in Kuwait.
“I’ve experienced a number of benefits from studying an
online MBA with the University of Liverpool. I’ve really been
able to apply the knowledge and skills from my MBA into
my day-to-day working life and this has had an impact on
company results. The outcome of this was that my company
decided to pay the full programme for me on my behalf. On
a more personal level, I actually feel different now, I feel more
professional and because of my MBA experience, I trust myself
more than before.”
3
in partnership with
Hussam admits that time management for was one of the
biggest challenges for him. “As a frequent business traveller, I
had to manage my time between travelling, attending meetings
and studying. Practically speaking, the main issue I had
to deal with during my studies was how to manage time.”
He continues by telling us that since gaining his MBA, “I trust
myself to make the right decisions for my future.”
Have Jeetendra and Hussam’s experiences inspired you
to take the next step in your career and follow an online
Masters programme? Then click here to read more about the
University of Liverpool’s online programmes or if you have
any questions, please feel free to contact us send an email to:
middleeastalumni@ohecampus.com

Jeetendra Lulla (MSc IT) and Hussam Salem Abou-Loghod (MBA), two recent University of Liverpool graduates tell us about their expectations, the benefits of online learning, day-to-day experiences, the support they received and their plans for the future.

Jeetendra Lulla is an IT consultant from Dubai and a regular business traveller throughout the Middle East region. He recently graduated with a Master of Science in Information Technology.

“After a lot of hard work, this is a great achievement for me. It’s very highly valued to have a Masters degree in my industry.”

Jeetendra gave us a brief insight into the day-to-day life of studying online:

“I would be interacting with fellow classmates from all over the world and you could expect people responding any time of day. I would log on to the classroom roughly 4 times a week and the other 2 days I would study by myself. So on average it would work out at around 2 hours a day. The interaction in the classrooms themselves was very exciting – and the opinions, experiences and challenges faced by different people in different places are varied and quite unique. This makes you take on a more universal approach in your thinking.”

Looking forward, Jeetendra told us that achieving his Masters has really;

“…given me the opportunity to pursue more academic courses, perhaps another Masters or even the DBA. Having my MSc in IT gives me a more competitive edge in my future career.”

Hussam Salem Abou-Loghod is another recent graduate, having successfully achieved his MBA. Hussam is from Pakistan and works as CFO for a listed company in Kuwait.

“I’ve experienced a number of benefits from studying an online MBA with the University of Liverpool. I’ve really been able to apply the knowledge and skills from my MBA into my day-to-day working life and this has had an impact on company results. The outcome of this was that my company decided to pay the full programme for me on my behalf. On a more personal level, I actually feel different now, I feel more professional and because of my MBA experience, I trust myself more than before.”

Hussam admits that time management for was one of the biggest challenges for him.

“As a frequent business traveller, I had to manage my time between travelling, attending meetings and studying. Practically speaking, the main issue I had to deal with during my studies was how to manage time.”

He continues by telling us that since gaining his MBA;

“I trust myself to make the right decisions for my future.”

Have Jeetendra and Hussam’s experiences inspired you to take the next step in your career and follow an online Masters programme? Then click here to read more about the University of Liverpool’s online programmes or if you have any questions, please feel free to contact us send an email to: middleeastalumni@ohecampus.com

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